Monthly Archives: June 2010

All Terrorists are Muslims…Except the 94% that Aren’t

,

All Terrorists are Muslims…Except the 94% that Aren’t

Posted on 20 January 2010 by Danios

terrorism_has_no_religion

CNN recently published an article entitled Study:
Threat of Muslim-American terrorism in U.S. exaggerated
; according
to a study released by Duke University and the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, “the terrorist threat posed by radicalized
Muslim-Americans has been exaggerated.”

Yet, Americans continue to live in mortal fear of radical Islam, a
fear propagated and inflamed by right wing Islamophobes.  If one follows
the cable news networks, it seems as if all terrorists are Muslims.  It
has even become axiomatic in some circles to chant: “Not all Muslims
are terrorists, but nearly all terrorists are Muslims.” Muslims and
their “leftist dhimmi allies” respond feebly, mentioning Waco as the one
counter example, unwittingly affirming the belief that “nearly all
terrorists are Muslims.”

But perception is not reality.  The data simply does not support such
a hasty conclusion.  On the FBI’s official website, there exists a
chronological list of all terrorist attacks committed on U.S. soil from
the year 1980 all the way to 2005.  That list can be accessed here
(scroll down all the way to the bottom).

Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Soil by Group, From 1980 to 2005, 
According to FBI Database

Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Soil by Group, From 1980 to 2005, According
to FBI Database

According to this data, there were more Jewish acts of terrorism
within the United States than Islamic (7% vs 6%).  These radical Jews
committed acts of terrorism in the name of their religion.  These were
not terrorists who happened to be Jews; rather, they were extremist Jews
who committed acts of terrorism based on their religious passions, just
like Al-Qaeda and company.

Yet notice the disparity in media coverage between the two.  It would
indeed be very interesting to construct a corresponding pie chart that
depicted the level of media coverage of each group.  The reason that
Muslim apologists and their “leftist dhimmi allies” cannot recall
another non-Islamic act of terrorism other than Waco is due to the fact
that the media gives menial (if any) coverage to such events.  If a
terrorist attack does not fit the “Islam is the perennial and
existential threat of our times” narrative, it is simply not paid much
attention to, which in a circuitous manner reinforces and “proves” the
preconceived narrative.  It is to such an extent that the average
American cannot remember any Jewish or Latino terrorist; why should he
when he has never even heard of the Jewish Defense League or the
Ejercito Popular Boricua Macheteros?  Surely what he does not know does
not exist!

The Islamophobes claim that Islam is intrinsically a terrorist
religion.  The proof?  Well, just about every terrorist attack is
Islamic, they retort.  Unfortunately for them, that’s not quite true. 
More like six percent.  Using their defunct logic, these right wingers
ought now to conclude that nearly all acts of terrorism are committed by
Latinos (or Jews).  Let them dare say it…they couldn’t; it would be
political and social suicide to say such a thing. Most Americans would
shut down such talk as bigoted; yet, similar statements continue to be
said of Islam, without any repercussions.

The Islamophobes live in a fantasy world where everyone is supposedly
too “politically correct” to criticize Islam and Muslims.  Yet, the
reality is the exact opposite: you can get away with saying anything
against the crescent.  Can you imagine the reaction if I said that
Latinos should be profiled because after all they are the ones who
commit the most terrorism in the country?  (For the record: I don’t
believe in such profiling, because I am–unlike the right wing nutters–a
believer in American ideals.)

The moral of the story is that Americans ought to calm down when it
comes to Islamic terrorism.  Right wingers always live in mortal fear–or
rather, they try to make you feel that way.  In fact, Pamela
Geller (the queen of internet Islamophobia) literally said her
mission was to “scare the bejeezus outta ya.”
Don’t be fooled, and
don’t be a wuss.  You don’t live in constant fear of radicalized Latinos
(unless you’re Lou Dobbs), even though they commit seven times more
acts of terrorism than Muslims in America.  Why then are you wetting
yourself over Islamic radicals?  In the words of Cenk Uygur: you’re at a
ten when you need to be at a four.  Nobody is saying that Islamic
terrorism is not a matter of concern, but it’s grossly exaggerated.

Related Posts:

Europol
report: All terrorists are Muslims…Except the 99.6% that aren’t

RAND
report: Threat of homegrown jihadism exaggerated, Zero U.S. civilians
killed since 9/11

Advertisements

Muslims the focus of misplaced fears

Muslims the focus of misplaced fears

Muslims the focus of misplaced fears
RACHEL WOODLOCK
February 20, 2010

There is no hidden agenda for sharia law; Western society is not under threat.

“F— Off We’re Full” is one of the more odious Facebook groups in which members regularly bemoan Muslim immigration to Australia. It is currently in its sixth incarnation, having been taken offline and then replaced by other similarly named groups. Still, the viral meme lives on. Jade encourages people to join a petition to ”send asylum boat people home”; Faye makes a joke offering ”Muslims, Lebs an Indians” free bungee jumps with ”no strings attached”; and Kris wonders why wherever Islam is, ”evil follows”.

The sentiment “don’t come here if you don’t like our way of life” means nothing when you consider that, at last count, 40 per cent of Muslims in Australia were not foreign immigrants but were born here. Lots of Mohammads and Aishas are true-blue, happy little Vegemites sitting next to our Jacks, Marias, Sanjeevs and Nguyens in school, and that percentage is sure to increase at the next census.

However, the thrust of their arguments, and the much milder variants that spring from the mouths of politicians and the pens of journalists, is that the demographic growth of Muslims in Australia and other Western nations is a worrying phenomenon that, if left unchecked, could destroy the very fabric of Western society.

There are a number of interrelated fears of Muslims that boil down to the prophecy that on attaining sizeable numbers, Muslims will seek to impose their religion on other Australians, either by force or by creeping Islamisation. Evidence for this grim fantasy is seen in everything from innocuous halal-certification for food to the myth of the Muslim eradication of Christmas from kindergartens and council premises.

But for those who worry about Muslims in their midst, nothing screams “Islam is coming” louder than the sight of heavily veiled women in supermarkets, libraries, parks and other public spaces.

It is little wonder that the French have pounced on Islamic female dress as the epitome of un-French. Veiled Muslim women are viewed both as aggressively intruding into hard-won French secularity, and at the same time embodying passive acquiescence to misogynist oppression.

The solution trumpeted by defenders of French identity, under the guise of women’s rights, is to substitute a perceived lack of freedom with an actual one.

A burqa ban would mean that Muslim men might no longer force their women to cover up through presumed social pressure, because the state will force them to uncover through legal proscription, all in the name of upholding liberty and equality.

There are some Australian commentators urging the same for our Muslims – fortunately few take them seriously.

In reality, the debate is not about women’s rights. It is about whether Muslim immigration and settlement will fundamentally and negatively alter the fabric of Western society. In other words, are Muslims a slow-growing cancer?

The evidence suggests that Muslim settlement and integration into Australian society is, by and large, successful. Contrary to the alarmist rhetoric of shock-jocks and pundits, political Islamism and the establishment of theocracy is not mainstream theology, nor is it how most Muslims interpret the role of religion in society.

It is simply untrue that Muslim Australians are interested in superimposing some overseas model of sharia law in Australia.

A good many of them (or their parents) fled totalitarian regimes in search of freedom and they tell us they have found it in Australia.

As part of an Australian Research Council Linkage project, 600 Muslim Australians were surveyed about their experiences of life in Australia. “Freedom” was rated as the top characteristic of Australian society when participants were presented with a mixed list of 20 Australian and un-Australian attributes.

Of 594 participants who answered the questions, 87 per cent agreed or strongly agreed they could be both a “good Muslim and a good Australian” at the same time. Only 5 per cent felt conflicted enough to disagree or strongly disagree with the notion, and this is partly due to a feeling that to be truly Australian means having British ancestry or doing things that conflict with Islam (such as drinking beer).

There are some problems: Muslims suffer for the want of good leadership (although the appointment of Sheikh Fehmi al-Imam as Mufti of Australia was a step in the right direction), and community infrastructure needs development. This has long been hindered by myopic local councils rejecting mosque and school proposals.

The success of Muslim settlement and inclusion in Australian society can be attributed in part to the way we construct an inclusive national identity and to the democratic freedoms – including religious freedom – that Australia offers its citizens.

This success would be imperilled by French-style bans and a shift to exclusivist, monocultural nationalism that is hindering European attempts to grapple with changing demographics.

Rachel Woodlock is a researcher and doctoral candidate at the Centre for Islam and the Modern World, Monash University.

Convert Petrol Cars to Electricity for Rs. 4.8 Lakh

June 9, 2010 | 12
comments

Steel City Project Converts Gasoline Cars to Run on Electricity

ChargeCar aims to create a kit that makes it easy for local auto
shops to convert conventional cars to electric.

By Saqib
Rahim
and Climatewire   

 

OAS_AD(“x81”);

CATALYTIC CONVERTER:
Instead of selling pricey new vehicles, the ChargeCar team wants to
create a kit that makes it easy for local auto shops to convert gasoline
cars to run on electricity.
ISTOCKPHOTO/sjlocke

aArticleImages = new Array;

aArticleImages[0] = new Object;
aArticleImages[0].title = “CATALYTIC CONVERTER:”;
aArticleImages[0].caption = “Instead of selling pricey new vehicles, the ChargeCar team wants to create a kit that makes it easy for local auto shops to convert gasoline cars to run on electricity.”;
aArticleImages[0].credit = “ISTOCKPHOTO/sjlocke”;
aArticleImages[0].url = “http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-3474372-auto-repair.php”;
aArticleImages[0].alt = “”;
aArticleImages[0].src = “/media/inline/steel-city-project-converts-gas-cars-to-electric_1.jpg”;
aArticleImages[0].thisImageNumber = “1”;

.atools_holder {border:#e4e0dd 1px solid; width:78px; background-color:#e4e0dd; color:#999; text-align:center; margin:0 0 5px 5px;}
.atools_holder {text-align:-moz-center}
.atools {width:98%; padding:3px 1px 0 0}
.atools {text-align:-moz-center}

.atools img {margin-bottom:5px; display:block;}

.badge {padding: 2px; background-color:#fff; width:54px;margin-bottom:3px; left: 50%;}
#atools_sponsor {width:88px;}
#atools_sponsor span {font-size:8px !important; color:#999; font-family:Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important; text-align:center}

var newURL = “”;
newURL = location.href.replace(/&[e|s]c=[A-Za-z0-9_]{2,15}/,”); //strip ec or sc codes
newURL = newURL.replace(/&page=[0-9]{1,2}/,”); //strip pagination from articles
newURL = newURL.replace(/&SID=mail/,”); //strip SID from mailarticle feature
var newTitle = document.title;
//alert(newURL)
digg_url = newURL;

e-mail

print

comment

0diggsdigg
stumble_url = newURL;

PITTSBURGH — Chuck Wichrowski remembers the first car he ever worked
on, when he was just a college graduate and knew nothing about cars:
His wife’s 1970 Chevy Nova.

The second? A 1964 Studebaker Wagonaire.

“I just sort of applied the college model, which is: You look the
things up, you get a book, and then you do it,” Wichrowski said.

As the years rolled by, Wichrowski put his wrench to the cars that
drove the Steel City through its industrial heyday. But times have
changed in Pittsburgh, and while he still runs Baum Boulevard
Automotive, his customers have moved on to mostly foreign cars, and
increasingly, hybrids.

Wichrowski used to run two gas stations, and he knows electric-drive
cars need less maintenance than the gas-driven ones. Yet he has loaned a
mechanic to a local university to help it design electric cars for
regular Pittsburghers, and he thinks his shop can cash in if the future
really is electric.

And for the team at Carnegie
Mellon University
, which is designing cars to get residents to
work without burning a pint of gas or even wasting an electron, the
future of electric cars is Pittsburgh.

Designers of the ChargeCar
project say that instead of selling pricey new vehicles, they want to
create a kit that makes it easy for local auto shops like Wichrowski’s
to convert a gasoline car to run on electricity.

“There’s a bunch of machine shops running idle in Pittsburgh,” said Illah Nourbakhsh, a robotics
professor at CMU and a co-director of ChargeCar. “There’s a ton of
shops that can do that kind of thing. There’s mechanical know-how in
this town like no other that I’ve seen.”

Electric-car conversions have been available for decades, whether
through small, independent companies or engineers tinkering in their
garages. But ChargeCar is likely the first effort to gut a gasoline car
and redesign it for a single purpose: the perfect commute.

When Nourbakhsh and his colleagues looked at how Pittsburghers
drive, they found that most trips are about half a dozen miles. Some
zoom along the highway, while others plod past stop signs and red
lights. Some drive on flat roads; others climb or coast down the city’s
hilly terrain.

The team reckoned a battery, combined with a gadget called a
supercapacitor
and controlled by software, could make most of these
miles electric-powered, at a price Pittsburghers could afford.

Fiddling and fact-finding
ChargeCar’s latest projects sit in a former gas station across the
street from Carnegie Mellon. One is a 2006 Honda Civic: Over the next
month, the team will convert it into a short-range, all-electric car.
Wichrowski’s mechanic will lend a hand and advise on how to make such
conversions as simple as possible for other auto repairers in
Pittsburgh.

The other car in the garage feels more like an airplane. From the
outside, it looks like a common Scion xB; surrounding the cockpit,
though, are scores of dials and gauges.

The car is an experiment.

As Nourbakhsh pulls onto the road, he points to wobbling needles and
flashing numbers on the computer screen. This car is powered by a
battery and a supercapacitor, and these gauges are constantly crunching
numbers: how much juice is left, how much power is flowing, how hot the
battery is.

He switches between using the supercapacitor and the battery. He
tries each one on hills, up and down. When he slows at a red light, he
can choose which device he wants to charge up.

As the professor fiddles, the team is learning important facts about
the most efficient way to power an electric car.

The reason has to do with how batteries work — and a major
technical challenge for automakers.

Custom-designed batteries?
Batteries are good at storing energy, but they degrade if they have to
take on, or release, too much power too quickly. To deal with that
degradation, automakers stuff cars with larger batteries, but that adds
cost and weight.

Unlike batteries, supercapacitors are built for abuse: They can take
a huge charge and discharge, thousands of times, without losing a step.

They’re not so good at holding a charge, Nourbakhsh says, so the
team decided to pair one with a battery.

Those Pittsburgh hills and traffic lights? They become energy
savers.

“When you’re stopping, all the current gets dumped into the
capacitor, therefore saving the energy so that you can reuse it, rather
than going into the battery, because putting it into the battery costs
battery life,” he says.

As the argument goes, if one knows exactly how someone drives, it’s
possible to come up with the perfect-size battery and supercapacitor for
that driver.

At www.chargecar.org, the
group is asking Web surfers to share information on their commutes in
gasoline cars, including every highway ride and stop at Starbucks.

A $10,000 price tag
Nourbakhsh and his team are at work on a computer program that can
predict where a driver speeds up, hits traffic and pauses for doughnuts
— all to make a battery system that’s the perfect size.

Over time, this program could even learn more about the driver,
firing up the capacitor or battery at precisely the right times to get
her to work.

Nourbakhsh says a regular battery may cost $8,000, but adding a
$1,000 capacitor to handle the sudden charges means the battery doesn’t
need to be as big, so the combo may cost only $2,000.

The total price of conversion? ChargeCar is targeting a $10,000 tag.

Paul Scott, vice president of advocacy group Plug-in America,
said such a system could be the “magic bullet” of energy storage in
cars, since it balances capacity and power.

Capacitors have already drawn interest from researchers, engineers
and even some of the automakers. A spokesman for Toyota said, however,
that the company has placed more focus on other electric technologies
because it found capacitors too costly.

Scott panned the idea of designing electric cars mainly geared to
the commute. “Everybody I know drives a car a lot of different ways,”
not just for commuting but also for going to the movies or visiting
friends, he said.

Mechanics say this is the future
“If you optimize a car for just one specific task, it may not work as
well for other tasks,” he said.

Nourbakhsh said the car doesn’t have to spend its last electron at
the office — it’s possible to design “headroom” for a specific commute
while still being efficient and saving on cost.

“But the point is, for the thing you do most frequently — that you
spend the most energy on — let’s have it be super-efficient at that,”
he said in an e-mail.

Some families might choose to have a ChargeCar and reserve a
gasoline car for longer trips, said Leland Thorpe, a master’s student at
Carnegie Mellon who’s on the ChargeCar team.

The project is recruiting local companies to sponsor the first wave
of car conversions. Nourbakhsh says that would be a uniquely Pittsburgh
solution, as companies “green” their reputations and Pittsburghers do
the work in auto shops.

Even if electric cars catch on in Pittsburgh, Wichrowski, the
manager of Baum Boulevard Automotive, isn’t worried about having to lay
off mechanics.

“Every hybrid car that we have also has conventional brakes,
conventional exhaust, other things that you really need to do to have a
regular car,” he said as customers milled in and out of the shop. “They
just have an added layer of the hybrid system bolted into the car
somewhere.”

He said today, some cars have up to a dozen computers
to control their systems: air conditioners, power steering and the
like.

The modern mechanic often has the equipment and know-how to work
with them, so electric cars shouldn’t be too much harder.

“This is something that all the technicians are going to have to
move into,” he says. “If you want to repair cars, you’re going to have
to be able to know how to do this.”

Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from Environment &
Energy Publishing, LLC. www.eenews.net,
202-628-6500

0diggsdigg

Keyboard Shortcuts

Gmail – Fwd: ҉ Kerala Friends ҉ General keyboard shortcuts – mohamediqbalp@gmail.com

Remember these keys!! when ur mouse is not working, this is very helpful.

General keyboard shortcuts

* CTRL+C (Copy)

* CTRL+X (Cut)

* CTRL+V (Paste)

* CTRL+Z (Undo)

* DELETE (Delete)

* SHIFT+DELETE (Delete the selected item permanently without placing the item in the Recycle Bin)

* CTRL while dragging an item (Copy the selected item)

* CTRL+SHIFT while dragging an item (Create a shortcut to the selected item)

* F2 key (Rename the selected item)

* CTRL+RIGHT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next word)

* CTRL+LEFT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word)

* CTRL+DOWN ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next paragraph)

* CTRL+UP ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous paragraph)

* CTRL+SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Highlight a block of text)

* SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Select more than one item in a window or on the desktop, or select text in a document)

* CTRL+A (Select all)

* F3 key (Search for a file or a folder)

* ALT+ENTER (View the properties for the selected item)

* ALT+F4 (Close the active item, or quit the active program)

* ALT+ENTER (Display the properties of the selected object)

* ALT+SPACEBAR (Open the shortcut menu for the active window)

* CTRL+F4 (Close the active document in programs that enable you to have multiple documents open simultaneously)

* ALT+TAB (Switch between the open items)

* ALT+ESC (Cycle through items in the order that they had been opened)

* F6 key (Cycle through the screen elements in a window or on the desktop)

* F4 key (Display the Address bar list in My Computer or Windows Explorer)

* SHIFT+F10 (Display the shortcut menu for the selected item)

* ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the System menu for the active window)

* CTRL+ESC (Display the Start menu)

* ALT+Underlined letter in a menu name (Display the corresponding menu)

* Underlined letter in a command name on an open menu (Perform the corresponding command)

* F10 key (Activate the menu bar in the active program)

* RIGHT ARROW (Open the next menu to the right, or open a submenu)

* LEFT ARROW (Open the next menu to the left, or close a submenu)

* F5 key (Update the active window)

* BACKSPACE (View the folder one level up in My Computer or Windows Explorer)

* ESC (Cancel the current task)

* SHIFT when you insert a CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive (Prevent the CD-ROM from automatically playing)

* CTRL+SHIFT+ESC (Open Task Manager)

Dialog box keyboard shortcuts

If you press SHIFT+F8 in extended selection list boxes, you enable extended selection mode. In this mode, you can use an arrow key to move a cursor without changing the selection. You can press CTRL+SPACEBAR or SHIFT+SPACEBAR to adjust the selection. To cancel extended selection mode, press SHIFT+F8 again. Extended selection mode cancels itself when you move the focus to another control.

* CTRL+TAB (Move forward through the tabs)

* CTRL+SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the tabs)

* TAB (Move forward through the options)

* SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the options)

* ALT+Underlined letter (Perform the corresponding command or select the corresponding option)

* ENTER (Perform the command for the active option or button)

* SPACEBAR (Select or clear the check box if the active option is a check box)

* Arrow keys (Select a button if the active option is a group of option buttons)

* F1 key (Display Help)

* F4 key (Display the items in the active list)

* BACKSPACE (Open a folder one level up if a folder is selected in the Save As or Open dialog box)

Microsoft natural keyboard shortcuts

* Windows Logo (Display or hide the Start menu)

* Windows Logo+BREAK (Display the System Properties dialog box)

* Windows Logo+D (Display the desktop)

* Windows Logo+M (Minimize all of the windows)

* Windows Logo+SHIFT+M (Restore the minimized windows)

* Windows Logo+E (Open My Computer)

* Windows Logo+F (Search for a file or a folder)

* CTRL+Windows Logo+F (Search for computers)

* Windows Logo+F1 (Display Windows Help)

* Windows Logo+ L (Lock the keyboard)

* Windows Logo+R (Open the Run dialog box)

* Windows Logo+U (Open Utility Manager)

Accessibility keyboard shortcuts

* Right SHIFT for eight seconds (Switch FilterKeys either on or off)

* Left ALT+left SHIFT+PRINT SCREEN (Switch High Contrast either on or off)

* Left ALT+left SHIFT+NUM LOCK (Switch the MouseKeys either on or off)

* SHIFT five times (Switch the StickyKeys either on or off)

* NUM LOCK for five seconds (Switch the ToggleKeys either on or off)

* Windows Logo +U (Open Utility Manager)

Windows Explorer keyboard shortcuts

* END (Display the bottom of the active window)

* HOME (Display the top of the active window)

* NUM LOCK+Asterisk sign (*) (Display all of the subfolders that are under the selected folder)

* NUM LOCK+Plus sign (+) (Display the contents of the selected folder)

* NUM LOCK+Minus sign (-) (Collapse the selected folder)

* LEFT ARROW (Collapse the current selection if it is expanded, or select the parent folder)

* RIGHT ARROW (Display the current selection if it is collapsed, or select the first subfolder)

Shortcut keys for Character Map

After you double-click a character on the grid of characters, you can move through the grid by using the keyboard shortcuts:

* RIGHT ARROW (Move to the right or to the beginning of the next line)

* LEFT ARROW (Move to the left or to the end of the previous line)

* UP ARROW (Move up one row)

* DOWN ARROW (Move down one row)

* PAGE UP (Move up one screen at a time)

* PAGE DOWN (Move down one screen at a time)

* HOME (Move to the beginning of the line)

* END (Move to the end of the line)

* CTRL+HOME (Move to the first character)

* CTRL+END (Move to the last character)

* SPACEBAR (Switch between Enlarged and Normal mode when a character is selected)

Microsoft Management Console (MMC) main window keyboard shortcuts

* CTRL+O (Open a saved console)

* CTRL+N (Open a new console)

* CTRL+S (Save the open console)

* CTRL+M (Add or remove a console item)

* CTRL+W (Open a new window)

* F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)

* ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the MMC window menu)

* ALT+F4 (Close the console)

* ALT+A (Display the Action menu)

* ALT+V (Display the View menu)

* ALT+F (Display the File menu)

* ALT+O (Display the Favorites menu)

MMC console window keyboard shortcuts

* CTRL+P (Print the current page or active pane)

* ALT+Minus sign (-) (Display the window menu for the active console window)

* SHIFT+F10 (Display the Action shortcut menu for the selected item)

* F1 key (Open the Help topic, if any, for the selected item)

* F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)

* CTRL+F10 (Maximize the active console window)

* CTRL+F5 (Restore the active console window)

* ALT+ENTER (Display the Properties dialog box, if any, for the selected item)

* F2 key (Rename the selected item)

* CTRL+F4 (Close the active console window. When a console has only one console window, this shortcut closes the console)

Remote desktop connection navigation

* CTRL+ALT+END (Open the Microsoft Windows NT Security dialog box)

* ALT+PAGE UP (Switch between programs from left to right)

* ALT+PAGE DOWN (Switch between programs from right to left)

* ALT+INSERT (Cycle through the programs in most recently used order)

* ALT+HOME (Display the Start menu)

* CTRL+ALT+BREAK (Switch the client computer between a window and a full screen)

* ALT+DELETE (Display the Windows menu)

* CTRL+ALT+Minus sign (-) (Place a snapshot of the entire client window area on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing ALT+PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

* CTRL+ALT+Plus sign (+) (Place a snapshot of the active window in the client on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

Microsoft Internet Explorer navigation

* CTRL+B (Open the Organize Favorites dialog box)

* CTRL+E (Open the Search bar)

* CTRL+F (Start the Find utility)

* CTRL+H (Open the History bar)

* CTRL+I (Open the Favorites bar)

* CTRL+L (Open the Open dialog box)

* CTRL+N (Start another instance of the browser with the same Web address)

* CTRL+O (Open the Open dialog box, the same as CTRL+L)

* CTRL+P (Open the Print dialog box)

* CTRL+R (Update the current Web page)

* CTRL+W (Close the current window)

Islamic Mortgages and Why They’re Not Just for Muslims

Islamic Mortgages and Why They’re Not Just for
Muslims

Islamic Mortgages and not just for Muslims which may come as a
suprise for some. However, an Islamic mortgage does have its
differences.

What is an Islamic Mortgage?

According to Islam, making money from money is “usury” and is not
permitted. This includes receiving or paying interest (it is wrong to
assist another in making money from money). prayer roomThis creates an obvious
problem for a muslim who wishes to own his own property. Buying outright
with cash will not be an option open to the vast majority and a
traditional interest based mortgage loan cannot be obtained with
compromising his religious beliefs. Islamic mortgages (also called
Shariah or Halal mortgages) were introduced to combat this problem and
provide a method of obtaining finance from a lending institution without
paying interest. Whilst the the main purpose of this method of
borrowing is to allow muslims to maintain their beliefs while leading
normal lives when living in non-Islamic countries, it has other
advantages which have nothing to do with religion.

How Do Banks Make a Profit?

Naturally banks still want to make a profit on the money they lend
and they do this by either buying the property from the seller at the
normal agreed price and selling it on the borrower for a higher price or
by buying the property and renting it to the borrower during the
continuance of the term.

How Do Islamic Mortgages Work?

There are two main types of Islamic Mortgage, Murabaha and Ijara:

Murabaha

With this arrangement the purchaser finds a property and agrees a
purchase price with the seller in the usual way.The bank then purchases
the property on behalf of the buyer and immediately sells it to the
buyer at a higher price. A percentage of the purchase price (the
deposit) is paid to the bank immediately and the remainder is paid in
monthly instalments over the term. The instalments are fixed over the
life of the term. The maximum amount of the purchase price the bank will
agree to defer will be 80%, in other words a minimum 20% deposit will
be required to obtain this type of mortgage so it is only suitable for
those buyer who have substantial capital to invest.

Ijara

Again, you will find a property and agree a purchase price and the
bank will buy the property, however with this arrangement the property
will be registered to the bank who will grant a lease to you and give
you a “promise to sell”.

google_protectAndRun(“ads_core.google_render_ad”, google_handleError, google_render_ad);

The term of the lease will be equal to the term of the mortgage. You
will make monthly payments which compromise a rent for the use of the
bank’s share of the property and a payment to acquire part of the bank’s
share. The rent payments will usually be reviewed each year, just as
rent on an assured shorthold tenancy might be. At the end of the term
you will have acquired all of the bank’s share and the bank will be
required to make good on its promise to sell by transferring the
freehold title to you. The lease term will have come to an end and it
will be extinguished. The advantage of this arrangement over Murabaha is
that a smaller deposit will be acceptable, perhaps 10%.

What if I Have an Islamic Mortgage and Want to Sell Before the End
of the Term?

There is no reason that you cannot sell before the end of the term
and repay the borrowing in full, and this can usually be done without
penalty. The bank’s promise to sell is simply enforced earlier. You
would only pay the bank the amount originally borrowed less any payments
already made, so that the bank does not get a share of any increase in
value.

Which Banks Provide Islamic Mortgages?

There are a number of banks which provide Islamic mortgage products,
including Bristol & West, HSBC and the Islamic Bank of Britain among
others.

Can I Get Repossessed if I Have an Islamic Mortgage?

Unfortunately yes, you always at risk of repossession if you purchase
a property with the benefit of a mortgage and fail to keep up
repayments.

I’ve Heard I Might Have to Pay Two Lots of Stamp Duty?

It used to be the case that with a Islamic mortgage, you had to pay
stamp duty once on the original purchase and again at the end of the
mortgage term when the bank transferred the property to you, but this
was remedied in the Finance Act 2003 and is no longer the case.

I’m Not a Muslim, So Why Would I Get an Islamic Mortgage?

One advantage of the Murabaha type of mortgage is that the payments
are fixed throughout the life of the term. This means you don’t have to
worry about your payments increasing to a level you can’t afford if
there is a sharp rise in interest rates, as would happen with a
conventional mortgage. Obviously the disadvantage is that you would not
benefit from any decrease in interest rates.

The monthly payments on this type of mortgage will be calculated
based on the interest rate prevailing at the time so while rates are
low, although initially the payments will be higher than a traditional
mortgage (the bank will set the payments higher because they know they
cannot be changed), over the life of the mortgage as interest rates but
your payments don’t, you may well end up better off.

With the Ijara type, payments are reviewed annually and will increase
and decrease in line with interest rates.

Photo by dynamosquito

Prince Charles speaks on Islam and the Environment

Associated Press Of Pakistan ( Pakistan’s Premier NEWS Agency ) – Prince Charles speaks on Islam and the Environment

 
LONDON, June 10 (APP)-The heir to the British throne Prince Charles of Wales has paid tribute to the role of faith communities in the UK and praised the work done by Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies (OXCIS) in particular the Young Muslim leadership programme.The Prince delivered a speech on ‘Islam and the Environment’ at OXCIS) where he was invited as Patron of Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies to help celebrate the centre’s 25th anniversary.‘This is a vital contribution to the process of boosting the self-esteem of young Muslims, about whom I care deeply,’ he told the gathering.

The Prince of Wales reaffirmed the need to help UK’s minority communities and faith groups integrate into British Society. The Prince has spent more than 25 years working on encouraging UK minority communities to integrate into British society and to build good relationships between all faith communities.His Royal Highness said:
‘Over the last twenty-five years, I have tried to find as many ways as possible to help integrate them into British society and to build good relationships between our faith communities. I happen to believe this is best achieved by emphasizing unity through diversity. Only in this way can we ensure fairness and build mutual respect in our country. And if we get it right here then perhaps we might be able to offer an example in the wider world.’
The Prince chose “Islam and the Environment” as the focus of his speech, bringing together two important strands of his work over three decades. Addressing the audience, The Prince spoke about the importance to realise the damage which Mankind is doing to the environment and take steps to halt it, before it is too late.
‘One of the many issues of commonality between the World’s great faiths is a strong focus on protection of the environment which is God’s creation,’ he said.
He encouraged the people of faith around the World to reconnect with their sacred teachings on this issue. His Royal Highness said that there was a current division between Man and Nature which was not only caused by industrialisation, technological development and the pursuit of economic growth, but also by attitudes to the relationship with Nature.
He said that a way of thinking had evolved over the last few centuries that he believed went against the grain of all the teachings of the world’s sacred traditions, including Islam. He said that all great faiths are rooted in an understanding of the fact that Man is a part of Nature, not apart from Nature, and must always live within Nature’s means and limits.
The Prince of Wales spoke about the great importance and respect the Islamic faith attaches to the preservation of the environment. He said: ‘From what I know of the Quran, again and again it describes the natural world as the handiwork of a unitary benevolent power. It very explicitly describes Nature as possessing an “intelligibility’ and that there is no separation between Man and Nature, precisely because there is no separation between the natural world and God. It offers a completely integrated view of the Universe where religion and science, mind and matter are all part of one living, conscious whole.
‘If I may quote the Quran, ‘Have you considered: if your water were to disappear into the Earth, who then could bring you gushing water?’
This is the Divine hospitality that offers us our provisions and our dwelling places, our clothing, tools and transport. The Earth is robust and prolific, but also delicate, subtle, complex and diverse and so our mark must always be gentle.’
The Prince also noted that these teachings were also evident in Judaism and in his own faith, Christianity and were well expressed in the writings of Islamic poets and scholars, and Western poets like Wordsworth.
Ending his speech, The Prince said: ‘There is a profound truth in that seemingly simple, old saying of the nomads ­ that “the best of all Mosques is Nature herself”.’

Modi Govt ad on ‘Muslims shining in Gujarat’ has picture from Azamgarh

By Mumtaz Alam Falahi, TwoCircles.net,

New Delhi: Yes, it is fact. Patna dailies today carried one-page
Gujarat Government ad on ‘prosperity’ and ‘good living’ of Muslims in
the land of Narendra Modi. But the photo that the ad carries to prove
the point has just been lifted from Internet. The photo of Muslim girls
learning computer is not from Gujarat, rather Azamgarh.

The full one-page ad that has published in various dailies here
today, one day before Modi reaches Patna to attend the two-day BJP
National Executive meet, has four pictures: one in which Modi shaking
hands with skull-capped Muslims, another showing young Muslim girls in
Hijab learning computer, another one showing Muslim children learning in
a madrasa and one big photo of the ‘iron man.’ As evidence of Muslims’
progress in Gujarat, the ad carries these pictures wherein Muslim girls
and children are shown learning. As the ad is about Muslims’ progress in
Gujarat one can expect the pictures are also from the state. But here
is the big lie.


Gujarat govt. ad published in Patna dailies on 10 June 2010

The picture of young Muslim girls learning computer is not from
Gujarat. Neither the girls are Gujarati, nor was the picture shot in
Gujarat. In fact, it is a picture of Azamgarh National Shibli College
girls attending a computer class in the college campus. The picture was
shot by this correspondent of TwoCircles.net during his visit to
Azamgarh in November 2008. The picture was used in the November 24, 2008
TCN story titled “Muslim girls in Azamgarh getting higher education, giving tough fight to boys

The title of the ad is: Muslims in Gujarat enjoy better education,
employment opportunities, financial stability, health facilities,
infrastructure. It says Muslims in the land of Modi are prosperous and
enjoying better life. But this one lie could be enough to expose the
lies of Gujarat Government about prosperity of Muslims in the state.

The ad has published in various dailies including Roznama Rashtriya
Sahara and Pindar (Urdu), Hindustan (Hindi), Times of India and
Hindustan Times (English). Here is another interesting point – a proof
of disrespect towards Urdu language that is second official language in
Bihar. While English dailies have carried the ad in English language and
Hindi in Hindi language but Urdu dailies were not given Urdu version of
the ad. Rather they were given the Hindi version of the ad which they
‘promptly’ carried.


This TCN photo was published in our story on 24 Nov. 2008

Cypriot Muslim and Pope embrace in UN Buffer Zone

The Muslim News

Cyprus/TRNC:

07-06-2010

NICOSIA, Cyprus,(Zenit.org).- Saturday in Nicosia Benedict, XVI met with an important figure among Cypriot Muslims, Shaykh Nazim al-Qubrusi al-Haqqani, 89, spiritual leader of a Sufi movement, and participant in interreligious dialogue.

The brief meeting took place outside the apostolic nunciature before the Pope went to celebrate Mass in the Church of the Holy Cross.

The two religious leaders met along the “Green Line,” the U.N. buffer zone, which, since the Turkish invasion of 1974, divides the Turkish Cypriot community and the Greek Cypriot community.

According to a Vatican Radio report, the Sufi leader lives behind the church in the north of Cyprus, and came to greet the Pontiff. He apologized for sitting down.

“I am very old,” Nazim said.

“I am very old, too,” the Pope responded.

Nazim then presented Benedict XVI with an ornate cane, a plaque inscribed with the Arabic word for peace and a Muslim rosary. The Pontiff, for his part, offered Nazim a medallion. They then embraced in a gesture of fraternal affection.

At the end of the meeting Nazim asked Benedict XVI to pray for him.

“I will certainly do so,” the Pope answered. “Let’s pray for each other.”

Afghans believe US is funding Taliban

Intellectuals and respected Afghan professionals are convinced the
west is prolonging conflict to maintain influence in the region

Daniella Peled

It’s near-impossible
to find anyone in Afghanistan who doesn’t believe the US are funding
the Taliban: and it’s the highly educated Afghan professionals, those
employed by ISAF, USAID, international media organisations – and even
advising US diplomats – who seem the most convinced.

US troops
It is the common
belief among Afghans that the west has no intention of ending the
conflict in Afghanistan. (Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

One Afghan friend, who speaks flawless English and likes to
quote Charles Dickens, Bertolt Brecht and Anton Chekhov, says the
reason is clear. “The US has an interest in prolonging the conflict so
as to stay in Afghanistan for the long term.”

The
continuing violence between coalition forces and the Taliban is simple
proof in itself.

“We say in this country, you need
two hands to clap,” he says, slapping his hands together in
demonstration. “One side can’t do it on its own.”

His
arguments are reasoned, although he slightly ruins the effect by
explaining to me that no Jews died in the Twin Towers. It’s not just the
natural assets of Afghanistan but its strategic position, the logic
goes. Commanding this country would give the US power over India,
Russia, Pakistan and China, not to mention all the central Asian states.

“The US uses Israel to threaten the Arab states, and they
want to make Afghanistan into the same thing,” he says. “Whoever
controls Asia in the future, controls the world.”

“Even
a child of five knows this,” one Kabuli radio journalist tells me,
holding his hand a couple of feet from the ground in illustration. Look
at Helmand, he says; how could 15,000 international and Afghan troops
fail to crush a couple of thousand of badly equipped Taliban?

And as for the British, apparently they want to stay in
Afghanistan even more than the Americans. The reason they want to talk
to the Taliban is to bring them into the government, thus consolidating
UK influence.

This isn’t just some vague prejudice or
the wildly conspiratorial theories so prevalent in the Middle East.
There is a highly structured if convoluted analysis behind this. If the
US really wanted to defeat the Taliban, person after person asks me, why
don’t they tackle them in Pakistan? The reason is simple, one friend
tells me. “As long as you don’t get rid of the nest, the problem will
continue. If they eliminate the Taliban, the US will have no reason to
stay here.”

The proof is manifold, they say (although
it does tend to include the phrase guaranteed to dismay every
journalist: “everybody knows that …”).

Among the
things everybody knows are that Afghan national army troops report
taking over Taliban bases to find identical rations and weapons to their
own US-supplied equipment. The US funds the madrasas both in
Afghanistan and in Pakistan, which produce the young Talibs. US army
helicopters regularly deliver supplies behind Taliban lines. The aid
organisations are nothing more than intelligence-collecting agencies,
going into regions the army cannot easily reach to obtain facts on the
ground. Even the humblest midwife-training project is a spying outfit.

One political scientist, who works as an advisor to US
agencies in the north of the country, recounts how people fear the
continuing influence of the warlords, illustrating his point with
descriptions of violence and corruption that extends into the realms of
banking, government and trade.

Afghans hate these
warlords, he says, but the US wants them kept in place. “If they were
removed, and competent and clean people brought in, we would bring in
revenues of our own. We could have our own economy, and demand foreign
investment with transparency. We would have a true army, to protect us
and serve Afghanistan.”

So why do these well-educated
Afghan professionals work for governments they are convinced want to
sink their claws into their country?

There’s nothing
contrived about their patriotism – with their skills they could easily
study or work abroad, but choose to stay to build a better future for
their country. Afghans have a historical suspicion towards any foreign
power involved in their country and maybe with the resilience of a
nation which has seen off one occupier after another, they are willing
to wait it out, confident the will of the US will break before their
own.

They don’t want Nato to leave for 15, maybe 20
years, anyway. It will take that long for Afghan institutions to be able
to survive independently. In the meantime, as my literature-loving
friend – who works for a number of US agencies – tells me, there is no
contradiction in survival. “I like Benjamin Franklin in my pocket,” he
smiles. So much for hearts and minds.

Publish on
The Guardian “comment is free” column on May 25, 2010.

Jews are related genetically to Palestinian Arabs?

Jews worldwide share genetic ties

But analysis also reveals close links to Palestinians and Italians.

Boy watching his father lighting Menorah on last day of Chanukah.A common ‘genetic thread’ runs through Jewish populations scattered across the globe.Shmulitk / iStockphoto

Different communities of Jews around the world share more than just religious or cultural practices — they also have strong genetic commonalities, according to the largest genetic analysis of Jewish people to date.

But the study also found strong genetic ties to non-Jewish groups, with the closest genetic neighbours on the European side being Italians, and on the Middle Eastern side the Druze, Bedouin and Palestinians.

Researchers in New York and Tel Aviv conducted a genome-wide analysis on 237 individuals from seven well-established Jewish communities around the world, hailing from Iran, Iraq, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Syria and eastern Europe. The team then compared these genetic profiles to those of non-Jews in the same geographic regions based on data from the Human Genome Diversity Project, a database of genomic information for individuals from populations worldwide. Each group of Jews is genetically distinct, but similarities between the groups weave them together with what the researchers describe as “genetic thread”.

“There has been this back and forth discussion over the course of a century or more — are these a people? Is this in the genome?” says Harry Ostrer, a geneticist at New York University, the study’s lead author. The new findings, he says, show that there “does seem to be a genetic basis to Jewishness”.

Several studies in the past decade have looked at the genetics of Jewish populations, using smaller numbers of individuals, or focusing on markers in mitochondrial DNA — which is passed down maternally — or on the Y chromosome, inherited paternally. The genetic ties identified in the present study, published in the June issue of theAmerican Journal of Human Genetics 1, are consistent with the results of previous work, says Sarah Tishkoff, a human geneticist at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, “but this is, I would say, the first study to put everything together into a big picture by looking at a large number of sites in the nuclear genome”.

Close neighbours

The researchers analysed single-letter differences in the genome called single nucleotide polymorphisms, longer segments of DNA shared between different Jewish groups, as well as deleted or duplicated stretches of DNA called copy-number variants. Although the groups had strong genetic commonalities, the results also showed a varying degree of genetic mixing with nearby non-Jewish populations. The most genetically distinct Jewish communities, compared both to other Jewish groups and to nearby non-Jews, were those from Iran and Iraq.

“We really see the events of the Jewish diaspora in the genomes of Jewish people.”


The study provides a genetic basis for confirming or debunking theories of Jewish origin and history, says Ostrer. For example, one theory proposes that Ashkenazi Jews (of eastern European origin) are largely descended from Khazars in eastern Europe who converted to Judaism, but the genetic closeness between Ashkenazi Jews and other non-European Jews does not support this idea.

The study also highlights how genetics can reflect history, Ostrer says, including evidence of the dispersal of Jewish populations throughout the Middle East and Europe. “We really see the events of the Jewish diaspora in the genomes of Jewish people.”

Using a computer simulation, the researchers estimate that the genetic split between Middle Eastern and European Jews occurred about 100–150 generations ago, or 2,500 years ago — when Jewish communities are thought to have become established in Persia and Babylon. They also trace a high level of genetic mixing between Ashkenazi Jews and nearby non-Jews to more recent times, corresponding to a period between the beginning of the fifteen century and the start of the nineteenth century when the Jewish population in Europe swelled from about 50,000 to 5 million.

Timing question

But constructing a timeline on the basis of genetic analysis is tricky, say others. “There are too many assumptions you have to make,” says David Goldstein, a geneticist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “I don’t think we have the resolution right now in the genetics to time the events.”

Another tantalizing question that the study doesn’t address, he says, is the historical explanation for the shared genetics between the Jewish groups. Although the data point to a common ancestral origin in the Middle East, further details — such as when and how much different populations intermixed — are impossible to glean. “That level of resolution is just not there,” he says.

Ostrer says that the researchers are extending their analysis to more Jewish populations. They also hope to apply the findings to medical research by focusing on some of the longer shared genetic markers that have been identified. The group is now studying the genetic susceptibility to breast and prostate cancers among Ashkenazi Jews, he says, and other groups are using genetic mapping techniques to study conditions such as Crohn’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. 

UN advice: circumcise to prevent HIV

International health agencies sing praises of surgical procedure.

Should health clinics in Africa advise circumcision?Should health clinics in Africa advise circumcision?WHO/Rapelang Radebe

The United Nations (UN) has recommended circumcision as a means of reducing the risk of HIV infection in heterosexual men. The announcement should pave the way for African governments to incorporate the practice into their AIDS-prevention strategies.

“The evidence is now really quite conclusive that male circumcision is effective in preventing HIV infection in heterosexually exposed males,” says Kevin De Cock, director of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) department of HIV/AIDS. “The effectiveness is approaching 60%.”

The practice could be particularly effective in southern and eastern Africa, where HIV is common, circumcision rates are low and transmission is mainly heterosexual, he adds.

“This is an exciting development,” says Catherine Hankins, chief scientific adviser at UNAIDS. “We haven’t had news like this for an extremely long time.” If governments can devise action plans, international agencies are willing to provide funding and technical support, she says.

But, she adds, circumcision must be added to the package of HIV-prevention measures, such as sex education and condoms, rather than be seen as a replacement.

“Individual countries have to take these recommendations and consider them,” says Kim Dickson, a medical officer working on HIV prevention at the WHO. “Countries will engage in their own consultations to make decisions on how they roll this out, and whether this is relevant to them.” They will need to address questions about how to target such programmes, provide training and equipment, ensure proper hygiene, and consider issues of consent and public attitudes to the practice.

Kindest cut

Researchers have been studying the effects of circumcision on disease transmission for some 20 years. By 2006 the evidence of its usefulness against HIV seemed overwhelming (see ‘Time for the chop‘). In the wake of this, the WHO and UNAIDS convened a meeting of about 70 researchers, policy-makers, and representatives of funding agencies, human rights groups and patient advocacy groups in Montreux, Switzerland from 6-8 March to discuss potential recommendations.

“We were really struck by the remarkable consistency of the data,” says de Cock. “It’s very unusual.” And with a cost of around US$50-100 per person, he adds, circumcision appears to be as cost effective, if not more so, than many other interventions

Still uncertain is whether circumcising HIV-positive men reduces transmission to their female partners, and whether circumcision reduces the transmission risk from anal sex. Preliminary data from Uganda suggest that men with an unhealed circumcision wound are more at risk of transmitting the virus to their female partners.


Another major uncertainty, says Hankins, is whether the young, sexually active men most at risk of HIV will queue up for circumcision. The prevalence of the practice, and attitudes towards it, vary widely between and within countries.

But they can also change rapidly. There are reports of African men seeking circumcision after hearing about the successes of earlier trials. And South Korea went from nearly no circumcision to more than 60% between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.

Turkey holds activists’ funerals


Al Jazeera’s Jamal Elshayyal reports from
Istanbul after being released by Israel following convoy raid

Turkish forensic experts have confirmed that the
nine activists killed during the Israeli raid on the Gaza aid flotilla
were shot with guns.

Eight were Turks and one a US national of Turkish origin, the
Anatolia news agency reported on Thursday as funerals got under way in
Istanbul.



The remaining activists, including some who were
injured in the Israeli raid, landed in the Turkish city early on
Thursday.

Al Jazeera’s Jamal Elshayyal, who reported from the ship as the raid
began, was also sent to Turkey by Israel after being released by the
Israelis.

Elshayyal said that he witnessed some of the
killings, and confirmed that at least “one person was shot through the
top of the head from [the helicopter] above”.

IN DEPTH

Our producer was on the top deck when the ship was attacked and said
that within a few minutes of seeing the Israeli helicopters, there were
shots being fired from above.

“The first shots [coming from Israeli boats at sea] were tear gas,
sounds grenades and rubber coated steel bullets,” Elshayyal said.

“Live
shots came five minutes after that. There was definetly live fire from
the air and from the sea as well.”

He confirmed that some passengers took apart some of the ship’s
railing bars to defend themselves as they saw the Israeli soldiers
approaching.

“After the shooting and the first deaths, people put up white flags
and signs in English and Hebrew,” he said.

“An Israeli [on the ship] asked the soldiers to take away the
injured, but they did not, and the injured died on the ship.”

Heroes welcome

Earlier three air ambulances landed at a military base in Ankara, the
Turkish capital, carrying wounded activists who were transferred to
hospitals in the city.

Activists
killed

  Turkish victims
  Ibrahim Bilgen
  Ali Haydar Bengi
  Cevdet Kiliçlar
  Çetin Topçuoglu
  Necdet Yildirim
  Fahri Yaldiz
  Cengiz Songür
  Cengiz Akyüz
  US victim
  Furkan Dogan

Hundreds of supporters including Bulent Arinc, Turkey’s deputy prime
minister, and several other Turkish politicians were at the airport in
Istanbul to welcome the returning activists.

“They faced barbarism and oppression but returned with pride,” Arinc
told hundreds of jubilant relatives and supporters outside the airport,
chanting “God is Great!”

A crowd of several thousand gathered in central Istanbul to celebrate
the activists’ return.

An aircraft carrying 31 Greek activists, together with three French
nationals and an American, flew into Athens airport in the early hours
of Thursday, the Israeli foreign ministry said.

Seven activists wounded in Monday’s clashes were still being treated
in an Israeli hospital, it said.

Three others – an Irishman and two women from Australia and Italy
– remained in Israel “for technical reasons”, the ministry said.

But Ayman Mohyeldin, Al Jazeera’s correspondent in Jerusalem, said
that four Palestinian-Israelis remain in prison.

Our correspondent said that Raed
Salah,
a leader of the Islamic Movement in Israel, was one of those
still being held.

Israel defiant

Israel has remained defiant about the raid and says it is ready to
intercept another aid ship, the Rachel Corrie, that organisers
of the Freedom Flotilla say is due to head for the Gaza Strip next week.

IN DEPTH

 

  Blog: Israel defending the indefensible
  Twitter: Sherine Tadros
  Pictures: Protests around the world
  Previous
activists killed by Israel
  Focus: On board the Freedom Flotilla
  Focus: Gaza’s
real humanitarian crisis
  Video: Israel’s Gaza PR offensive
  Programmes: Born in Gaza

Accusing international critics of “hypocrisy,” Binyamin Netanyahu,
the Israeli prime minister, defended the seizure of the aid ships on
Wednesday.

“This was not the Love Boat,” he said in a televised address to the
nation, referring to the vessel boarded by commandos. “It was a hate
boat.”

“These weren’t pacifists, these weren’t peace activists, they were
violent supporters of terrorism.”

Netanyahu said the aim of the flotilla was to break the blockade of
Gaza, not to bring aid.

He said that if the blockade ended, ships would bring in thousands of
missiles from Iran to be aimed at Israel and beyond, creating what he
said would be an Iranian port on the Mediterranean.

“The same countries that are criticising us today should know that
they would be targeted tomorrow,” Netanyahu said.

However, Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, said the flotilla
tragedy only highlights the serious underlying problem – namely, the
siege imposed on the Gaza.

He said that the siege was “counter-productive, unsustainable and
wrong”.

“It punishes innocent civilians,” he said.

Ban said the siege should be lifted immediately.

No mention of inquiry

Netanyahu’s comments came hours after Turkey warned it would cut off
diplomatic ties with Israel if its citizens killed and injured in the
Gaza flotilla raid were not returned by Wednesday night.

Mohyeldin said the Israeli prime minister’s address did not include
mention of an inquiry into the attack, as many have demanded.

“If the international community, or the Turkish government, were
waiting to hear Binyamin Netanyahu announce an independent investigation
to look into this deadly raid, it certainly did not come as expected,
or as the international community and the UN Security Council had
demanded,” Mohyeldin said.

Thousands of
protesters welcomed the activists’ return to Turkey [Reuters]

“Instead the Israeli prime minister once again defended the Israeli
course of action.”

Ahmet Davutoglu, Turkey’s foreign minister, has called for an
international commission into the raid.

“We have clearly stated that we would review our ties with Israel if
all Turks not released by the end of the day,” he said on Wednesday.

Davutoglu also said Turkey was ready to normalise ties with Israel if
it lifted its blockade on Gaza, saying “it was time calm replaces
anger”.

Relations between Turkey and Israel have deteriorated rapidly since
the deadly raid, with most of the bloodshed occurring on the Mavi
Marmara
, a Turkish-flagged ship carrying hundreds of
pro-Palestinian activists.

State media reported on Wednesday that Turkey’s justice ministry is
considering legal action against Israel.

Officials are looking into both domestic and international law to see
what action might be undertaken after Monday’s operation in
international waters, a report by the Anatolia news agency said.

Israel-Beginning of the End?

Turkey
will “never forgive” Israel

Al Jazeera’s Jamal Elshayyal reports from
Istanbul after being released by Israel following convoy raid

The Turkish president has said that Israel’s
military raid on civilian aid ships bound for the Gaza Strip has caused
“irreparable” damage to his country’s relations with Israel, and will
“never” be forgiven.

“From now on, Turkish-Israeli ties will never be the same. This
incident has left an irreparable and deep scar,” Abdullah Gul said in a
televised speech on Thursday, as thousands gathered in the streets of
Istanbul to pay their respects to the humanitarian activists killed
during the raid.



The raid “is not an issue that can be
forgotten… or be covered up… Turkey will never forgive this attack,”
he said. 

Nine people – eight Turks and a US national of Turkish origin- were
killed in Monday’s pre-dawn raid on the Mavi Mamara, which was
carrying aid to Gaza in a bid to break Israel’s strangling blockade of
the territory.

As their funerals got underway on Thursday,
thousands poured onto the streets around the Fatih Mosque in Istanbul,
chanting slogans condemning Israel and waving Turkish and Palestinian
flags.

IN DEPTH

Turkish media estimated the size of the crowd as between 15,000 and
20,000 people, a reflection of the depth of anger in Turkey over the
Israeli assault on the ships.

Several imams directed the mourners in prayer as eight of the
coffins, draped in Turkish and Palestinian flags, were laid on marble
stands for people to pay their respects.

Shot from above

The demonstration came as Turkish forensic experts confirmed that the
nine activists had been shot dead.

Al Jazeera’s Jamal Elshayyal, who reported from the ship during the
raid, confirmed that live ammunition had been used by Israeli commandos
as they stormed the ship.

He said that he witnessed some of the killings, and confirmed that at
least “one person was shot through the top of the head from [the
helicopter] above.”

Activists
killed

  Turkish victims
  Ibrahim Bilgen
  Ali Haydar Bengi
  Cevdet Kiliçlar
  Çetin Topçuoglu
  Necdet Yildirim
  Fahri Yaldiz
  Cengiz Songür
  Cengiz Akyüz
  US victim
  Furkan Dogan

Elshayyal was on the top deck when the ship was attacked and said
that within a few minutes of seeing the Israeli helicopters, there were
shots being fired from above.

“The first shots [coming from Israeli boats at sea] were tear gas,
sound grenades and rubber coated steel bullets,” said Eshayyal.

“Live shots came five minutes after that. There was definitely live
fire from the air and from the sea as well.”

He confirmed that some passengers took apart some of the ship’s
railings to defend themselves as they saw the Israeli soldiers
approaching.

“After the shooting and the first deaths, people put up white flags
and signs in English and Hebrew,” he said.

“An Israeli [on the ship] asked the soldiers to take away the
injured, but they did not and the injured died on the ship.”

Injured flown home

Earlier on Thursday, three air ambulances landed at a military base
in Ankara, the Turkish capital, carrying wounded activists who were
transferred from Israeli custody to hospitals in the city.

Hundreds of supporters, including Bulent Arinc, Turkey’s deputy prime
minister, and several other Turkish politicians, gathered at the
airport in Istanbul to welcome the returning activists.

“They faced barbarism and oppression but returned with pride,” Arinc
told hundreds of jubilant relatives and supporters outside the airport,
chanting “God is Great!”

Almost all of the detained passengers on board the flotilla have
now been released.

Seven activists wounded in Monday’s clashes were still being treated
in an Israeli hospital, the Israeli foreign ministry said.

Three others – an Irishman and two women from Australia and Italy –
remained in Israel “for technical reasons”, the ministry said.

But Ayman Mohyeldin, Al Jazeera’s correspondent in Jerusalem, said
that four Palestinian-Israelis also remain in prison.

Our correspondent said that Raed Salah, a leader of the Islamic
Movement in Israel, was one of those still being held.

Israel defiant

Israel has remained defiant about the raid, rejecting calls for a
international investigation into the incident, and warning it is ready
to intercept another aid ship, the Rachel Corrie, that is due
to head for Gaza next week.

IN DEPTH

 

  Blog: Israel defending the indefensible
  Twitter: Sherine Tadros
  Pictures: Protests around the world
  Previous
activists killed by Israel
  Focus: On board the Freedom Flotilla
  Focus: Gaza’s
real humanitarian crisis
  Video: Israel’s Gaza PR offensive
  Programmes: Born in Gaza

Accusing international critics of “hypocrisy,” Binyamin Netanyahu,
the Israeli prime minister, defended the seizure of the aid ships on
Wednesday.

“This was not the Love Boat,” he said in a televised address to the
nation, referring to the vessel boarded by commandos. “It was a hate
boat.”

“These weren’t pacifists, these weren’t peace activists, they were
violent supporters of terrorism.”

Netanyahu said the aim of the flotilla was to break the blockade of
Gaza, not to bring aid.

He said that if the blockade ended, ships would bring in thousands of
missiles from Iran to be aimed at Israel and beyond, creating what he
said would be an Iranian port on the Mediterranean.

“The same countries that are criticising us today should know that
they would be targeted tomorrow,” Netanyahu said.

However, Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, said the flotilla
tragedy only highlights the serious underlying problem – namely, the
siege imposed on the Gaza.

He said that the siege was “counter-productive, unsustainable and
wrong”.

“It punishes innocent civilians,” he said, calling for the siege to
be lifted immediately.

 Source: Al Jazeera and agencies

History repeats with a twist

By Andrew Wander in on June 2nd, 2010

The Exodus 1947
carried Jewish refugees bound for Palestine
The raid on the Mavi Mamara has
parallels with another chapter of history in the region.

It was a military raid on a civilian ship bound for Palestine,
carried out in the international waters of the Mediterranean to prevent
the boat from reaching its blockaded destination.
When the soldiers boarded they met with stiffer resistance than they
expected, and so they used force, killing some of the passengers and
injuring many others.
The commandeered ship was towed to port and the survivors were
detained, before being deported amid a storm of international
condemnation.
The year was 1947, and the boat – the Exodus
1947
– was carrying Jewish refugees seeking to land without the
permission of the British military force in charge of Palestine.
The incident, which left three dead, is now seen as a key event in
the lead up to the end of the British mandate in Palestine and the
establishment of the state of Israel.
Israeli historians will be hoping that this week’s raid on the
humanitarian flotilla that was bound for Gaza will not be Israel’s own Exodus
moment.
It is too early to tell whether the incident will change the way the
world sees Israel’s strangling blockade of the Gaza Strip. But the
parallels between this week’s events and those of 1947 will be enough to
worry Israeli historians.
In 1947, international sympathy for Holocaust-surviving Jews and
their quest for a homeland crystalised around the treatment of those on
board the Exodus, who were eventually sent, in a move of
stunning insensitivity given recent history, to detention camps in
Germany.
In 2010, it is the residents of Gaza, themselves stateless and
suffering in the aftermath of a brutal conflict, whose plight has been
highlighted by a misjudged military assualt.
The violence on board the Mavi Mamara is being seen as a
symptom of the blockade on Gaza, just as the events of 1947 were seen as
evidence of a deep unfairness in the treatment of refugee Holocaust
survivors.
Then, there was a recognition that the status quo was not tenable,
and a year later, the state of Israel was founded.
As a result of Israel’s raid on the Mavi Mamara, it is
today’s bitter status quo that is now being questioned. It is
unclear whether the incident will, like the Exodus did 63 years
ago, represent a tipping point, or just another sad milestone on a road
to further suffering.
There are as many differences as similarities between the two
situations. It would be wrong to make too much of the parallels.
But it would also be wrong to disregard them. Tipping points tend not
to be visible until they have been crossed.