Monthly Archives: June 2012

Anti-Muslim bias lawsuit against the US Commission on International Religious Freedom !!

Anti-Muslim bias lawsuit against the US Commission on International Religious Freedom

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A Muslim woman has filed a lawsuit against the US Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) alleging that she was sacked by the commission because of her religion. Ironically, the commission is assigned to advocate religious freedom globally.

Safiya Ghori-Ahmad filed the lawsuit on June 7, 2012 in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia saying that USCIRF rescinded a job offer after learning that she was Muslim and worked for a group promoting Muslims’ civil rights in the United States.

Ghori-Ahmad was hired to work as an analyst and immediately was asked to produce a report on religious freedom in Pakistan to test if she could write “objectively.” Ghori-Ahmad said a commissioner detected no sign of bias in her report but still objected to hiring her.   “Passing these tests (which she did) made no difference to the commissioners who opposed working with a Muslim,” said the lawsuit, which seeks a jury trial.

The suit quotes Commissioner Nina Shea as writing that “hiring a Muslim like Ms. Ghori-Ahmad to analyze religious freedom in Pakistan would be like “hiring an IRA activist to research the UK twenty years ago.'”

Ghori-Ahmad, a 26-year-old American born and educated in Arkansas, is seeking damages for distress as well as back pay, saying she was unemployed after the job offer was rescinded. She was later hired by the State Department.

According to a Washington Post report the commission’s six researchers signed a letter unsuccessfully urging their bosses to keep Ghori-Ahmad because of what they described as her strong résumé and the need for an analyst to cover the key region of South Asia. One researcher, Bridget Kustin, quit in protest, saying in her resignation letter that she would not “remain part of an organization that would be willing to engage in such discrimination.

 

The incident took place in 2009. Three commissioners whose actions were questioned in the lawsuit have since left after a shakeup last year led by Senator Dick Durbin, the second highest-ranking Democrat in the Senate. Speaking in December, Durbin said he “strongly” supported the group’s work but added: “I have been deeply troubled by allegations of misconduct, misuse of funds and discrimination at the Commission.”

Durbin spearheaded an amendment that limited terms of commissioners and subjected them to federal regulations on discrimination and expenses, amid charges that some had flown first class and stayed in expensive hotels.

The commission was set up under a 1998 law to advise the US government on religious freedom. It has strongly advocated for the rights of minorities around the world.

Its statements on the Islamic world have sometimes been controversial. In its latest annual report, it called for the State Department to put Turkey — a secular state and US ally — on a blacklist over religious freedom that includes countries such as China, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Rejecting the USCIRF’s 2012 annual report Turkey said on April 5: “The report, which is prepared by politicians representing some interest groups, contradicts the findings of U.S. State Department’s annual reports so far.” In a written statement the Turkish Foreign Ministry also criticized the report for failing to address incidents in Europe based on Islamophobia, with many mosques having been attacked and religious leaders being appointed by the state. The statement thus said that “the report [had been] prepared for political reasons.”

Shea and several other commissioners have long been accused of criticizing aspects of the Islamic faith in a way that unfairly stigmatizes all Muslims.

The allegations in the suit are the most explicit in a years-long series of allegations that commission leaders are biased against Muslims, specifically people associated with groups critical of U.S. foreign policy and who work for groups that fight anti-Muslim discrimination. Questions about the Ghori-Ahmad EEOC complaint — which commission lawyers had argued the body was exempt from — and how the commission uses its resources led some lawmakers last year to almost let USCIRF close for lack of reauthorization. Its budget was ultimately cut by a quarter and long-serving commissioners were forced out by retroactive term limits.

The anti-bias of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom is also reflected in the recent appointment of its commissioners. Last March Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) appointed well-known anti-Islam activist Dr. Zuhdi Jasser as a commissioner.

A broad national coalition of more than 60 civil advocacy organizations and individuals have sent a joint letter to Senators Inouye, McConnell and Durbin expressing “deep concern” at the controversial appointment of Zuhdi Jasser. The coalition asked that Jasser’s appointment be rescinded because he has been a vocal opponent of religious freedom for American Muslims.

The coalition noted that Jasser’s organization, the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, “applauded” an amendment to Oklahoma’s constitution that both a federal district court and the U.S. Court of Appeals 10th Circuit have held is in violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment by clearly favoring all other religions over Islam. That amendment specifically targeted      Islam for official censure.

The letter also cited Jasser’s opposition to the constitutionally-protected construction of a Muslim community center in lower Manhattan, his support for the New York Police Department’s blanket surveillance of Muslims based on religion rather than evidence or suspicion of wrongdoing and his ties to virulently anti-Muslim groups and individual Islamophobes.

Why the USCIRF has appointed a controversial commissioner, the reason one can see is the anti-Islam bias of the Commission reauthorized on Dec. 16, 2011 by the Congress through 2018, just hours before it was scheduled to go out of existence?

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9/11 was a planned demolition

Engineers and Architects 
http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/BachmannH.jpg“In my opinion the building WTC 7 was, with great probability, professionally demolished.” — Hugo Bachmann, Professor Emeritus, Former Chairman of the Department of Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/BarnumD.jpg“I have ‘known’ from day-one that the buildings were imploded and that they could not and would not have collapsed from the damage caused by the airplanes that ran into them.” — Daniel B. Barnum, Fellow American Institute of Architects 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/DeMartiniF.jpg“The building was designed to have a fully loaded 707 crash into it. . . . I believe that the building probably could sustain multiple impacts of jetliners because this structure is like the mosquito netting on your screen door.” — Frank A. DeMartini, Architect and WTC Construction Manager 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/GageR.jpg” . . . all three World Trade Center high-rise buildings, the Twin Towers and Building 7 were destroyed not by fire as our government has told us, but by controlled demolition with explosives.” — Richard Gage, Founding member Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/JohnsonD.jpg“Symmetrical collapse is strong evidence of a controlled demolition. A building falling from asymmetrical structural failure would not collapse so neatly, nor so rapidly”. — David A. Johnson, B.Arch, Professor Emeritus, F.AICP 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/JowenkoD.jpg“I looked at the drawings, the construction and it couldn’t be done by fire. So, no, absolutely not.” — Danny Jowenko, Proprietor, Jowenko Explosieve Demolitie B.V. (European demolition and construction company) 
http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/KellerJ.jpg“Obviously it [WTC 7] was the result of controlled demolition and scheduled to take place during the confusion surrounding the day’s events.” — Jack Keller, Professor Emeritus, Fellow American Society of Civil Engineers 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/MasudE.jpg“The 9/11 Commission Report is fatally flawed. The major conclusions of The 9/11 Commission Report, the official, conspiracy theory, are false.” — Enver Masud, Former Acting Chief Strategic & Emergency Planning, U.S. Dept of Energy, Consultant USAID and World Bank, author “9/11 Unveiled” 

University Professors 
http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/BarrettK.jpg“9/11, a carefully crafted ersatz-religious event, crafted by atheist neocons to dupe folks of good faith, has been exposed as a lie.” — Dr. Kevin Barrett, Co-founder Muslim-Jewish-Christian Alliance for 9/11 Truth, Host of The Kevin Barrett Show and Truth Jihad Radio 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/DewdneyAK.jpg“We have found solid scientific grounds on which to question the interpretation put upon the events of September 11, 2001 by the Office of the President of the United States” — A. K. Dewdney, Professor Emeritus, Member Scientific Panel Investigating Nine-Eleven 
http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/GriscomDL.jpg“Despite the absence of any visible fire at the time of collapse, the government report alleges WTC Building 7 is the first and only steel-framed high-rise building in the history of mankind to collapse simply as the result of a fire.” — David L. Griscom, PhD,Research physicist, Member Scholars for 9/11 Truth and Justice 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/HufferdJ.jpg“Muslims could not have had access to the . . . super controlled demolition blasting agent found in . . . dust samples from Ground Zero or to the buildings themselves to implant that material beforehand.” — James Hufferd, PhD, Founder 911 Truth of Central Iowa, Grassroots Coordinator of 911Truth.org 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/JonesS.jpg“I provide thirteen reasons for rejecting the official hypothesis, according to which fire and impact damage caused the collapse of the Twin Towers and WTC 7, in favor of the controlled-demolition hypothesis.” — Steven Jones, PhD, Former Professor of Physics, Principal Investigator U.S. DOE, Adv Energy Projects 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/MuminH.jpg“Truth, Ethics and Professionalism are completely lacking in the official aftermath and investigations surrounding the 911 disasters. Unfortunately we went to war predicated on lies, sustained in lies, and perpetuated in lies.” — Hamid Mumin, Ph.D., Prof. Engineer, past President of the Canadian Council of Professional Geoscientists 

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/SchiavoM.jpg” . . . this is the first time that families have been attempted to be silenced through a special fund, . . . the airlines approached members of Congress and the Senate to get their bailout and their immunity . . . starting on 9/11.” — Mary Schiavo, JD, Former Professor of Aviation

http://www.twf.org/News/Y2011/Photos/SchneiderJ.jpg“In my opinion the building WTC 7 was, with great probability, professionally demolished”. — Jorg Schneider, Dr hc, Professor Emeritus, Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

 

9 Nutrients to lose weight

Untitled Document

Graduate Degree For $100?

 

Myanmar probes into Muslim deaths

Myanmar probes into Muslim deaths amid tensions with Buddhists

(Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi talks to Myanmar Muslims leaders at the National League for Democracy head office in Yangon June 6, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun)

Myanmar’s government has appointed a minister and senior police chief to head an investigation into the killing of 10 Muslims by a Buddhist mob that has stoked communal tensions in the country’s Westernmost state.

The government has been quick to respond to Sunday’s killings by a group of vigilantes who were angered by reports of a recent gang rape and murder of a local woman, allegedly by Muslims in predominantly Buddhist Rakhine state.

The new reformist, civilian-led administration says national reconciliation and unity is one of its top priorities and its success in striking ceasefires with all but one of the country’s ethnic minority rebel groups may have played a part in the recent suspension of most Western sanctions.

It took the unusual step of announcing the probe on the front pages of several state-controlled newspapers on Thursday after a protest by Burmese Muslims in the biggest city, Yangon and anger on social media about the brutal killings and the media’s reporting of the incident.

Islam’s place in Europe

 

Islam’s place in Europe

In May, counter-demonstrators, above, stand near police barricades as a far-right, anti-Islam political party protests outside a mosque in Germany.
June 7th, 2012
01:36 PM ET

Islam’s place in Europe

A prime-time special: “Global Lessons: The GPS Roadmap for Making Immigration Work” debuts on CNN at 8 p.m. ET on Sunday, June 10.

Editor’s note: Jonathan Laurence is associate professor of political science at Boston College and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of “The Emancipation of Europe’s Muslims.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Jonathan Laurence.

By Jonathan Laurence, Special to CNN

Last month saw a series of riots in Europe, not over the wobbly Euro, but instead over the integration of Muslim Europeans and immigrants. In Bonn, hundreds of German Muslims clashed with police in a violent reaction to a far-right political party’s anti-Muslim gathering. The angry young men who chanted “God is Great” while battling police in the streets have reignited the ongoing debate over Islam’s place in Europe, a debate which has risen to the top of many politicians’ concerns. The German president said in a newspaper interview that while German Muslims clearly “belong” to the country, it is less clear whether or not Islam does.

But something arguably much more meaningful, if less newsworthy, took place days later. Groups representing hundreds of thousands of German Muslims condemned the violence and called on constituents to fulfill the civic duty of voting in regional elections that month.

Extremists such as the Salafist sympathizers who rioted are a miniscule fraction of this minority population: security services estimate their number in the low thousands, out of around 4.3 million Muslims in Germany. But as the French Salafist murderer of Toulouse proved in March, even very few of them can have a ruinous effect. Above all, they are a painful reminder of an era when European governments – in denial that Muslims would settle permanently – ignored who was doing the teaching and preaching of Islam on their territories.

A number of the social, cultural and political adjustments that will characterize Europe in coming generations are now under way, although often the results are not visible to the naked eye. Yet the most serious threats to integration — violent extremism among Muslims and right-wing nativism within “host societies” — are slowly being weakened by a confluence of old-fashioned integration processes in society and demographic trends.

The population of Muslim background in Europe will go from 16 million to around 27 million in the next 20 years, increasing the number of Muslims in European countries to more 7–8 percent (from 3.7 percent in 2008) — and to as high as 15–16 percent in France and Germany.

But the key development is that as the proportion of Muslims of foreign nationality residing in Europe decreases – because the number of native-born Muslims is growing – Europe’s democratic political institutions are increasingly kicking in. For decades, the absence of integration policy allowed foreign governments and transnational movements to capture the religious and political interests of this new minority. This wasn’t multiculturalism so much as indifference.

The series of terrorist attacks against Western capitals from 2001-2005, however, in combination with high unemployment and educational under-performance, ended Europeans’ hands-off approach. After leaving them outside domestic institutions for decades, governments gradually took ownership of their Muslim populations. Authorities began to treat Islam as a domestic religion and encouraged Muslims to embrace national citizenship.

This brought the religion out of the embassies and basements and into national institutions and proper mosques. Many of the rights and state oversight that other religious communities receive are slowly being extended to Islam councils, such as the German Islam Conference, which just held its seventh annual convention. Everything from imam training to animal slaughter to religious school curriculum has come under greater scrutiny and is being adapted – sometimes painfully — to fit where Muslims now live and work.

The resolution of practical problems related to Islamic observance helps reduce the tensions stemming from the religion’s relative new-ness, such as prayer-goers lying prone on sidewalks or blocking traffic, or anti-Semitic or other radical proselytizing in prisons because of an insufficient number of trained chaplains – which at least partly accounts for the radicalization of the Toulouse killer. The continued routinization of religious freedoms will also diminish the significance of religious inequality as a mobilizing issue in Muslim identity politics.

The normalization of Muslims’ participation in political life will also give a small voice in government to advocates of all partisan stripes. In just the past two weeks a French woman of Moroccan origin was named press secretary and a British politician became the first Muslim woman to join the national cabinet. Last year, three German women with a Turkish background became state-level ministers. These success stories join dozens of parliamentarians and hundreds of city councilors of Muslim background – and even a major party leader in Germany – of every political persuasion, across the continent.

Backlash against Muslim integration will continue to come from opposite corners. From the populist movements that are in a stronger position because of the recession and the currency crisis, and from foreign governments and international movements that don’t intend to let go without a fight.

But for every instance of Salafist “outrage” there are many more signs of Muslims’ social and political normalization. After the extremist group began to distribute millions of free Qur’ans, the Bundestag member Mehmet Kilic, a Green party politician with Turkish roots, distributed hundreds of copies of the German constitution in response.

When the Franco-Algerian soccer star Samir Nasri called out “Allahu Akbar” in a post-match interview celebrating his team’s championship this spring, he sounded more like a local Tim Tebow than an existential threat to Europeans’ way of life.

Post by:
Topics: Europe • Global Lessons • Immigration • Islam

http://iqsoft.co.in/3xiquvtv.html

Islam’s place in Europe

 

Islam’s place in Europe

In May, counter-demonstrators, above, stand near police barricades as a far-right, anti-Islam political party protests outside a mosque in Germany.
June 7th, 2012
01:36 PM ET

Islam’s place in Europe

A prime-time special: “Global Lessons: The GPS Roadmap for Making Immigration Work” debuts on CNN at 8 p.m. ET on Sunday, June 10.

Editor’s note: Jonathan Laurence is associate professor of political science at Boston College and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of “The Emancipation of Europe’s Muslims.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Jonathan Laurence.

By Jonathan Laurence, Special to CNN

Last month saw a series of riots in Europe, not over the wobbly Euro, but instead over the integration of Muslim Europeans and immigrants. In Bonn, hundreds of German Muslims clashed with police in a violent reaction to a far-right political party’s anti-Muslim gathering. The angry young men who chanted “God is Great” while battling police in the streets have reignited the ongoing debate over Islam’s place in Europe, a debate which has risen to the top of many politicians’ concerns. The German president said in a newspaper interview that while German Muslims clearly “belong” to the country, it is less clear whether or not Islam does.

But something arguably much more meaningful, if less newsworthy, took place days later. Groups representing hundreds of thousands of German Muslims condemned the violence and called on constituents to fulfill the civic duty of voting in regional elections that month.

Extremists such as the Salafist sympathizers who rioted are a miniscule fraction of this minority population: security services estimate their number in the low thousands, out of around 4.3 million Muslims in Germany. But as the French Salafist murderer of Toulouse proved in March, even very few of them can have a ruinous effect. Above all, they are a painful reminder of an era when European governments – in denial that Muslims would settle permanently – ignored who was doing the teaching and preaching of Islam on their territories.

A number of the social, cultural and political adjustments that will characterize Europe in coming generations are now under way, although often the results are not visible to the naked eye. Yet the most serious threats to integration — violent extremism among Muslims and right-wing nativism within “host societies” — are slowly being weakened by a confluence of old-fashioned integration processes in society and demographic trends.

The population of Muslim background in Europe will go from 16 million to around 27 million in the next 20 years, increasing the number of Muslims in European countries to more 7–8 percent (from 3.7 percent in 2008) — and to as high as 15–16 percent in France and Germany.

But the key development is that as the proportion of Muslims of foreign nationality residing in Europe decreases – because the number of native-born Muslims is growing – Europe’s democratic political institutions are increasingly kicking in. For decades, the absence of integration policy allowed foreign governments and transnational movements to capture the religious and political interests of this new minority. This wasn’t multiculturalism so much as indifference.

The series of terrorist attacks against Western capitals from 2001-2005, however, in combination with high unemployment and educational under-performance, ended Europeans’ hands-off approach. After leaving them outside domestic institutions for decades, governments gradually took ownership of their Muslim populations. Authorities began to treat Islam as a domestic religion and encouraged Muslims to embrace national citizenship.

This brought the religion out of the embassies and basements and into national institutions and proper mosques. Many of the rights and state oversight that other religious communities receive are slowly being extended to Islam councils, such as the German Islam Conference, which just held its seventh annual convention. Everything from imam training to animal slaughter to religious school curriculum has come under greater scrutiny and is being adapted – sometimes painfully — to fit where Muslims now live and work.

The resolution of practical problems related to Islamic observance helps reduce the tensions stemming from the religion’s relative new-ness, such as prayer-goers lying prone on sidewalks or blocking traffic, or anti-Semitic or other radical proselytizing in prisons because of an insufficient number of trained chaplains – which at least partly accounts for the radicalization of the Toulouse killer. The continued routinization of religious freedoms will also diminish the significance of religious inequality as a mobilizing issue in Muslim identity politics.

The normalization of Muslims’ participation in political life will also give a small voice in government to advocates of all partisan stripes. In just the past two weeks a French woman of Moroccan origin was named press secretary and a British politician became the first Muslim woman to join the national cabinet. Last year, three German women with a Turkish background became state-level ministers. These success stories join dozens of parliamentarians and hundreds of city councilors of Muslim background – and even a major party leader in Germany – of every political persuasion, across the continent.

Backlash against Muslim integration will continue to come from opposite corners. From the populist movements that are in a stronger position because of the recession and the currency crisis, and from foreign governments and international movements that don’t intend to let go without a fight.

But for every instance of Salafist “outrage” there are many more signs of Muslims’ social and political normalization. After the extremist group began to distribute millions of free Qur’ans, the Bundestag member Mehmet Kilic, a Green party politician with Turkish roots, distributed hundreds of copies of the German constitution in response.

When the Franco-Algerian soccer star Samir Nasri called out “Allahu Akbar” in a post-match interview celebrating his team’s championship this spring, he sounded more like a local Tim Tebow than an existential threat to Europeans’ way of life.

Post by:
Topics: Europe • Global Lessons • Immigration • Islam

http://iqsoft.co.in/3xiquvtv.html

Far-right extremists testify in Breivik trial

The Associated Press: Far-right extremists testify in Breivik trial

Far-right extremists testify in Breivik trial By JULIA GRONNEVET – 1 day ago  OSLO, Norway (AP) — A handful of Norwegian right-wing extremists testified Tuesday in self-confessed killer Anders Behring Breivik’s defense, backing his claims that Norway is “at war” with Islam. The 33-year-old self-styled anti-Muslim crusader has placed great importance on this line of argument, fearing his ideology could be undermined if he is declared insane. Breivik, on trial for killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting rampage in Oslo last July, has confessed to the attacks but denies criminal guilt. He claims he acted in self-defense because his victims had betrayed their country by embracing immigration. Defense lawyers attempted to show that while there are people who share Breivik’s worldviews, they are not declared mentally ill for doing so. “Norway is at war,” Tore Tvedt, a far-right extremist who has been convicted for his published anti-Semitic statements, told the court. He noted also how victimized he has felt by Norwegian police and public authorities for his political opinions. Although many of the witnesses echoed Breivik’s political views during the hearing, all of them took care to distance themselves from his violence. “We are a non-violent organization,” said Arne Tumyr, a long-time Islam critic and leader of the organization “Stop the Islamization of Norway.” But he declared that “Islam is an evil political ideology disguised as a religion.” Another witness, Ronny Alte, said that although he knows of no one in his immediate surroundings who supported Breivik’s actions, “there could easily be around a hundred that I know about” on the Internet who do. Breivik’s sanity is key to the case and is still an unresolved issue. Two psychological examinations carried out before the 10-week trial started in mid-April reached opposite conclusions on whether he is psychotic or not. If found guilty and sane, he would face 21 years in prison although he can be held longer if deemed a danger to society. If declared insane, he would be committed to compulsory psychiatric care. Although the trial is scheduled to end on June 22, the Oslo District Court on Tuesday announced that a verdict isn’t expected until July 20, or possibly even on Aug. 24, due to administrative and technological reasons as well as security issues. It declined to elaborate further.

http://iqsoft.co.in/3xiquvtv.html

Far-right extremists testify in Breivik trial

The Associated Press: Far-right extremists testify in Breivik trial

Far-right extremists testify in Breivik trial By JULIA GRONNEVET – 1 day ago  OSLO, Norway (AP) — A handful of Norwegian right-wing extremists testified Tuesday in self-confessed killer Anders Behring Breivik’s defense, backing his claims that Norway is “at war” with Islam. The 33-year-old self-styled anti-Muslim crusader has placed great importance on this line of argument, fearing his ideology could be undermined if he is declared insane. Breivik, on trial for killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting rampage in Oslo last July, has confessed to the attacks but denies criminal guilt. He claims he acted in self-defense because his victims had betrayed their country by embracing immigration. Defense lawyers attempted to show that while there are people who share Breivik’s worldviews, they are not declared mentally ill for doing so. “Norway is at war,” Tore Tvedt, a far-right extremist who has been convicted for his published anti-Semitic statements, told the court. He noted also how victimized he has felt by Norwegian police and public authorities for his political opinions. Although many of the witnesses echoed Breivik’s political views during the hearing, all of them took care to distance themselves from his violence. “We are a non-violent organization,” said Arne Tumyr, a long-time Islam critic and leader of the organization “Stop the Islamization of Norway.” But he declared that “Islam is an evil political ideology disguised as a religion.” Another witness, Ronny Alte, said that although he knows of no one in his immediate surroundings who supported Breivik’s actions, “there could easily be around a hundred that I know about” on the Internet who do. Breivik’s sanity is key to the case and is still an unresolved issue. Two psychological examinations carried out before the 10-week trial started in mid-April reached opposite conclusions on whether he is psychotic or not. If found guilty and sane, he would face 21 years in prison although he can be held longer if deemed a danger to society. If declared insane, he would be committed to compulsory psychiatric care. Although the trial is scheduled to end on June 22, the Oslo District Court on Tuesday announced that a verdict isn’t expected until July 20, or possibly even on Aug. 24, due to administrative and technological reasons as well as security issues. It declined to elaborate further.

http://iqsoft.co.in/3xiquvtv.html